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Adam Allington's Stories

Adam Allington was named the second recipient of The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Fellowship on the Economics of Aging and Work.

Kids leaving home doesn't always lead to parents saving more 7/20/2016

CHICAGO (AP) — Raising kids costs a lot of money, so when they finally strike out on their own it stands to reason that parents would have more money to spend, save or invest. How they spend that money can have large consequences for their retirement security.

A report by Boston College's Center for Retirement Research found that empty nesters do increase savings, but the increases are "extremely small," suggesting that baby boomers may be losing out on a critical opportunity to save for retirement.

Women more likely than men to face poverty during retirement​​​​​​​​ 7/10/2016

CHICAGO (AP) — During their working years, women tend to earn less than men, and when they retire, they're more likely to live in poverty.

These are women who raised children and cared for sick and elderly family members, often taking what savings and income they do have and spending it on things besides their own retirement security.

Many opt to take Social Security before full retirement age 5/26/2016

CHICAGO (AP) — Taking Social Security benefits early comes with a price, yet more than 4 in 10 Americans who are 50 and over say they'll dip into the program before reaching full retirement age.

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Thursday found that 44 percent report Social Security will be their biggest source of income during their retirement years.

Poll: Age, income factors in staying with single employer 5/10/2016

​CHICAGO (AP) — A new poll says more than 40 percent of America's baby boomers stayed with their employer for more than 20 years. But it's unlikely that their children or grandchildren will experience the same job tenure.

The survey of more than 1,000 Americans 50 and older by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that 41 percent of those employed workers have spent two decades with the same company, including 18 percent who've stayed at least 30 years.

For some, leaving workforce continues years after retiring 3/29/2016

​BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — The transition from employment to retirement used to be marked by a date on a calendar, along with some sheet cake, and a maybe a gold watch. Those days are long gone for most workers in the United States

For some, desire to work past 65 can often be problematic 2/17/2016

YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) — Earl Johnston was 12 when he got his first job, a paper route that he quickly expanded by "buying out" additional routes from other, less industrious boys.

After high school, he enrolled in a program to become an industrial electrician.

"With that journeyman's card in my back pocket, I had never had trouble finding work — ever," he said.

Older workers seeking options for reducing hours on the job 11/23/2015

Roberton Williams' plan was to retire on his government pension and take a part-time job to make up the difference in salary. It didn't quite work out that way.

Williams, 68, did retire but then started another full-time job with the Tax Policy Center, a Washington think tank.

"The plan was to work full time just until I got my feet wet," Williams said. "But, I ended up working full time for the next nine years."

He's far from an aberration. Many aging baby boomers are caught between a desire to work less and a labor market that just isn't ready to let them go.