SharePoint

Maria Ines Zamudio's Stories

Maria Ines Zamudio was named the third recipient of The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Fellowship on Economics and Aging and Work.

​Workplace accident death rate higher for older workers 8/2/2017

Chicago (AP) — Older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the rate of workplace fatalities decreases, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal statistics.

It’s a trend that’s particularly alarming as baby boomers reject the traditional retirement age of 65 and keep working. The U.S. government estimates that by 2024, older workers will account for 25 percent of the labor market.

Companies taking steps to keep older workers safe on the job 8/2/2017

Chicago (AP) — When managers at Bon Secours Virginia Health System started analyzing workers’ compensation cases, they noticed a bad combination: Older nurses were having problems from lifting heavy and sicker patients.

“We saw an increase in back injuries and older workers were more likely to suffer from those injuries,” said Jim Godwin, vice president of human resources. “Not only that, but we thought if we can keep workers from sustaining (back) injuries when they are younger, they can continue working longer.”

Experts: Uphill fight against age-related job discrimination 6/14/2017

WASHINGTON (AP) — Age-related discrimination in the workplace still exists 50 years after the enactment of legislation designed to prevent it, aging experts and advocates told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Wednesday.

Laurie McCann, senior attorney for the AARP Foundation Litigation, said the law “should not be treated as a second-class civil rights statute providing older workers far less protection than other civil rights laws.”

A third of older Latinos have tapped into retirement savings 5/24/2017

CHICAGO (AP) — Suddenly jobless and with small children to support, Jose Victor Camargo without hesitation cashed out a retirement account he had with his former employer.

That was more than a decade ago, and the father of three used the money to pay for rent and stay afloat until he found another job. “We are always in need, so I used the money,” he said in Spanish. “We were struggling. We tried to make the money stretch.”

Poll says blacks less likely to have enough for retirement 5/18/2017

CHICAGO (AP) — Older white Americans are nearly twice as likely as African-Americans to say they’ve saved enough for retirement, a new poll found.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey also found that African- Americans and Latinos have less financial security than whites and will rely on fewer sources of income during retirement. The retirement savings gap between white and other minority groups extends beyond pensions, 401(k)s or other retirement accounts.

Poll: Older ex-cons have fewer sources of retirement income 5/5/2017

CHICAGO (AP) — While many Americans his age are planning for retirement, Joseph Rodriguez is looking for his first permanent job.

Rodriguez, a 51-year-old Chicago resident, spent 35 years in prison for fatally shooting two people. “I don’t have the luxury to even think about that (retirement) since I’m having a late start in my life,” he says. “I’m going to have to constantly work until my last breath.”

States pursuing plans to help workers save for retirement 2/14/2017

CHICAGO (AP) — States are moving forward with new initiatives to help workers save for retirement, even as the Republican-led Congress tries to block​​​ rules making it easier for them to do so.

Studies show a sharp divide in retirement savings between those who have employer-sponsored plans and those who do not. The state programs are designed to fill in the gap.

Growing number of Americans are retiring outside the US 12/27/2016

Newly widowed, Kay McCowen quit her job, sold her house, applied for Social Security and retired to Mexico. It was a move she and her husband, Mel, had discussed before he passed away in 2012.

"I wanted to find a place where I could afford to live off my Social Security," she said. "The weather here is so perfect, and it's a beautiful place."

For some low-income workers, retirement is only a dream 10/24/2016

CHICAGO (AP) — It was a striking image. A photo of an 89-year-old man hunched over, struggling to push his cart with frozen treats. Fidencio Sanchez works long hours every day selling the treats because he couldn't afford to retire. The photo and his story went viral and thousands of people donated more than $384,000 for his retirement.

His story is a window into a dark reality: Many low-wage workers say they can't afford to retire.