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7/12/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Three-quarters in US say they lack influence
WASHINGTON (AP) — Linda Bell, a beekeeper and farmer who makes about $11,000 a year, feels Washington power brokers have no intention of making health care affordable.

“They don’t care about people like me,” says the Bosque County, Texas, resident.

Three-quarters of Americans agree that people like themselves have too little influence in Washington, rare unanimity across political, economic, racial and geographical lines and including both those who approve and disapprove of President Donald Trump, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Majorities also don’t have a great deal of confidence in most of the nation’s institutions. That’s especially true of Congress, which takes the biggest hit, and the presidency.
6/22/2017 Summer vacation: Never mind the hike. Where’s the hammock?
Never mind the hike. Where’s the hammock?

A new poll about summer travel finds that the No. 1 thing Americans want to do on vacation is ... nothing.

Almost three-fourths of Americans say resting and relaxing is very or extremely important to them when they go on vacation, according to the survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
6/20/2017 AP-NORC poll: Few favor Trump move to ditch Paris accord
WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than one-third of Americans support President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, a new poll shows, and just 18 percent of respondents agree with his claim that pulling out of the international agreement to reduce carbon emissions will help the U.S. economy.

The survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research earlier this month found that a slim majority — 52 percent — worry that withdrawing will actually hurt the economy. Twenty-seven percent think it won’t have an impact either way.
6/20/2017 Poll: Courts are right in blocking Trump’s travel ban
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say federal courts are acting properly in blocking President Donald Trump’s travel ban, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Two versions of the travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries have been put on hold by federal courts. Trump says the ban is necessary to keep would-be terrorists from traveling to the United States. Opponents, including some state officials, argue that it is intended to keep Muslims out.
6/15/2017 Summer vacation? Lots of Americans say they can’t afford it
Forget frequent flier miles, last-minute getaways and even road trips. Nearly half of Americans say they won’t be taking a vacation this summer, mostly because they can’t afford it, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The new AP-NORC survey, conducted in May, said 43 percent of Americans won’t be taking a summer vacation. The top reason for skipping a trip was the cost, cited by 49 percent of non-vacationers. Another 11 percent said they can’t take the time off from work, while 3 percent said they don’t like to be away from work.
6/15/2017 AP-NORC poll: Just 1 in 5 support Trump’s move to fire Comey
WASHINGTON (AP) — A clear majority of Americans believe President Donald Trump has tried to interfere with the investigation into whether Russia meddled in the 2016 election and possible Trump campaign collusion, a new poll released Thursday shows. Just one in five support his decision to oust James Comey from the FBI.

Following Comey’s blockbuster appearance before Congress, an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll shows 68 percent of Americans are at least moderately concerned about the possibility that Trump or his campaign associates had inappropriate ties to Russia. Almost half of Americans say they’re very concerned. Only 3 in 10 say they’re not that concerned.
6/14/2017 Poll shows most doubt Trump’s respect for institutions
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say they think President Donald Trump has little to no respect for the country’s democratic traditions, according to a new poll that underscores the difficulty Trump faces in uniting a country deeply divided about his leadership.

The new survey, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found more than 6 in 10 Americans disapprove of the job Trump is doing as president, and nearly half strongly disapprove. The poll was conducted before a shooting spree at a Washington-era baseball field on Wednesday left a congressman wounded and renewed calls for more civil political discourse.
6/14/2017 Experts: Uphill fight against age-related job discrimination
WASHINGTON (AP) — Age-related discrimination in the workplace still exists 50 years after the enactment of legislation designed to prevent it, aging experts and advocates told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Wednesday.

Laurie McCann, senior attorney for the AARP Foundation Litigation, said the law “should not be treated as a second-class civil rights statute providing older workers far less protection than other civil rights laws.”
5/25/2017 Poll: Older Americans want Medicare-covered long-term care
WASHINGTON (AP) — A growing number of Americans age 40 and older think Medicare should cover the costs of long-term care for older adults, according to a poll conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

That option is unlikely to gain much traction as President Donald Trump’s administration and Republicans in Congress look to cut the federal budget and repeal President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law. Most older Americans mistakenly believe they can rely on Medicare already, the poll shows, while few have done much planning for their own long-term care.
5/24/2017 ​A third of older Latinos have tapped into retirement savings
CHICAGO (AP) — Suddenly jobless and with small children to support, Jose Victor Camargo without hesitation cashed out a retirement account he had with his former employer.

That was more than a decade ago, and the father of three used the money to pay for rent and stay afloat until he found another job. “We are always in need, so I used the money,” he said in Spanish. “We were struggling. We tried to make the money stretch.”

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll found that older Latinos are more likely than older whites or older blacks to say they’ve had to withdraw or borrow money from a retirement account — 34 percent for Latinos compared with 24 percent for whites and 25 percent for blacks.
5/24/2017 Americans don’t trust media, but feel better about favorites
NEW YORK (AP) — While Americans have doubts about how much they should trust the “news media” in general, a poll by the Media Insight Project released Wednesday suggests they have a higher opinion of the sources they personally rely upon to follow the world.

The survey by the project, a partnership between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and American Press Institute, echoed the phenomenon where people express distaste for politicians yet support their local representatives.
5/18/2017 ​Poll says blacks less likely to have enough for retirement
CHICAGO (AP) — Older white Americans are nearly twice as likely as African-Americans to say they’ve saved enough for retirement, a new poll found.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey also found that African- Americans and Latinos have less financial security than whites and will rely on fewer sources of income during retirement. The retirement savings gap between white and other minority groups extends beyond pensions, 401(k)s or other retirement accounts.
5/12/2017 AP-NORC poll: Most Americans feel fine about school choice
WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as fierce political battles rage in Washington over school choice, most Americans know little about charter schools or private school voucher programs. Still, more Americans feel positively than negatively about expanding those programs, according to a new poll released Friday.

“I wonder what the fuss is about,” said Beverly Brown, 61, a retired grocery store worker in central Alabama. Brown, who doesn’t have children, says American schools need reform, but she is not familiar with specific school options and policies. “Educational standards have to be improved overall.”

All told, 58 percent of respondents say they know little or nothing at all about charter schools and 66 percent report the same about private school voucher programs, according to the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
5/5/2017 Poll: Older ex-cons have fewer sources of retirement income
CHICAGO (AP) — While many Americans his age are planning for retirement, Joseph Rodriguez is looking for his first permanent job.

Rodriguez, a 51-year-old Chicago resident, spent 35 years in prison for fatally shooting two people. “I don’t have the luxury to even think about that (retirement) since I’m having a late start in my life,” he says. “I’m going to have to constantly work until my last breath.”

A new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 69 percent of older Americans who reported having been incarcerated felt anxious about the amount of money they have saved for retirement, compared with 52 percent of those who didn’t serve time.
5/2/2017 Pay for news? More than half of Americans say they do
NEW YORK (AP) — A battered news industry can find some flickers of hope in a survey that gauges public willingness to pay for journalism, as long as its leaders plan judiciously.

A little more than half of American adults regularly pay for news, through newspaper and magazine subscriptions, apps on electronic devices or contributions to public media, according to the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
4/27/2017 AP-NORC poll: Most teens have taken social media break
NEW YORK (AP) — The common stereotype has teens glued to their phones 24-7. But nearly 60 percent of teens in the U.S. have actually taken a break from social media — the bulk of them voluntarily, a new survey found.

The poll, from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, surveyed teens aged 13 to 17 and found that most value the feeling of connection with friends and family that social media provides. A much smaller number associate it with negative emotions, such as being overwhelmed or needing to always show their best selves.
4/20/2017 ​AP-NORC Poll: Black teens most active on social media apps
Teenagers and their technology are inseparable, but a new poll shows black teens are the most likely to have access to smartphones — which could explain why they're the biggest and most frequent users of mobile-friendly social media apps Snapchat and Instagram.

A survey released Thursday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research explored teens' social media use and its relationship to race and class. The poll found that nearly 9 in 10 black teenagers use Snapchat, compared with just over 7 in 10 whites. And 4 in 10 black teens report using Snapchat almost constantly, compared with about 2 in 10 white teens.
4/6/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans oppose funding border wall
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans oppose funding President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and even many of his supporters reject his proposed budget cuts to scientific and medical research, according to poll released Thursday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The president gets higher marks for efforts to boost defense spending and beef up the border patrol, the poll found.
4/4/2017 Poll: Most young people say gov't should pay for health care
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most young Americans want any health care overhaul under President Donald Trump to look a lot like the Affordable Care Act signed into law by his predecessor, President Barack Obama.

But there's one big exception: A majority of young Americans dislike "Obamacare's" requirement that all Americans buy insurance or pay a fine.

A GenForward poll says a majority of people ages 18 to 30 think the federal government should be responsible for making sure Americans have health insurance. It suggests most young Americans won't be content with a law offering "access" to coverage, as Trump and Republicans in Congress proposed in doomed legislation they dropped March 24. The Trump administration is talking this week of somehow reviving the legislation.​
4/1/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans want independent Russia probe
NEW YORK (AP) — A slim majority of Americans favor an independent investigation into the Trump campaign's ties with the Russian government, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that showed public views about the controversy driving congressional investigations are sharply divided along party lines.

Amid questions swirling in Washington that have forced the resignation of one top Trump official and the scrutiny of several others, most Americans say they're at least somewhat concerned about the possibility that the Republican businessman's campaign had inappropriate contacts with the Russian government, but less than half say they're very concerned.
3/30/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most disapprove of Trump, except on economy
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans disapprove of Donald Trump's overall performance two months into his presidency. But they're more upbeat about at least one critical area: his handling of the economy.

Nearly 6 in 10 Americans disapprove of Trump's overall performance, and about the same percentage say the country is headed in the wrong direction, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. It was conducted amid the collapse of the GOP's health care overhaul.
3/30/2017 Poll: Americans dislike GOP's, Trump's plan on health care
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Note to President Donald Trump and House Republicans: People really don't like your approach to overhauling America's health care. If you're hoping to revive the effort, you may want to try something different.

Sixty-two percent of Americans turned thumbs down on Trump's handling of health care during the initial weeks of his presidency, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research released Wednesday. It was his worst rating among seven issues the poll tested, including the economy, foreign policy and immigration.
3/20/2017 ​​​Sharers rather than authors more important on social media
​NEW YORK (AP) — The person who shares a news story on social media is more important than the story's actual source in determining whether readers believe it, a study by the Media Insight Project has found.

In a previous study, consumers said they paid greater heed to where the story originated. But the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute, set up an experiment that found something different.
3/18/2017 Young Americans: Most see Trump as illegitimate president
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Jermaine Anderson keeps going back to the same memory of Donald Trump, then a candidate for president of the United States, referring to some Mexican immigrants as rapists and murderers.

"You can't be saying that (if) you're the president," says Anderson, a 21-year-old student from Coconut Creek, Florida.

That Trump is undeniably the nation's 45th president doesn't sit easily with young Americans like Anderson who are the nation's increasingly diverse electorate of the future, according to a new poll. A majority of young adults — 57 percent — see Trump's presidency as illegitimate, including about three-quarters of blacks and large majorities of Latinos and Asians, the GenForward poll found.
3/6/2017 Poll: Americans divided on admitting refugees
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Where immigrants are concerned, James Wright is OK with people who are here legally, as well as illegally — if they haven't committed crimes. But turn the talk specifically to the risks and benefits of admitting refugees to the U.S., and the New Jersey resident gives a fraught sigh.

"It's hard not to be conflicted," said Wright, 26, an independent who supports President Donald Trump's proposed travel ban on certain foreigners. "By no means do I want to be cruel and keep people out who need a safe place. But we have to have a better system of thoroughly finding out who they are."

Wright is part of a group of Americans a new survey suggests are making distinctions between legal immigrants who choose to be here and refugees — who are legal immigrants, too — fleeing persecution in their home countries. A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research reflects that divide, with two-thirds of the respondents saying the benefits of legal immigration generally outweigh the risks. But just over half — 52 percent — say refugees pose a great enough risk to further limit their entry into the United States.
3/5/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Divided Americans fret country losing identity
​NEW YORK (AP) — Add one more to the list of things dividing left and right in this country: We can't even agree what it means to be an American.

A new survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds Republicans are far more likely to cite a culture grounded in Christian beliefs and the traditions of early European immigrants as essential to U.S. identity.
2/27/2017 AP-NORC Poll: US teens disillusioned, divided by politics
​PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — In the days after President Donald Trump's election, thousands of teenagers across the nation walked out of class in protest. Others rallied to his defense.

It was an unusual show of political engagement from future voters who may alter America's political landscape in 2020 — or even in next year's midterm elections.

Now, a new survey of children ages 13 to 17 conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research with the permission of their parents finds that America's teens are almost as politically disillusioned and pessimistic about the nation's divisions as their parents. The difference? They aren't quite as quick to write off the future.
2/14/2017 ​​​​​States pursuing plans to help workers save for retirement
​CHICAGO (AP) — States are moving forward with new initiatives to help workers save for retirement, even as the Republican-led Congress tries to block​​​ rules making it easier for them to do so.

Studies show a sharp divide in retirement savings between those who have employer-sponsored plans and those who do not. The state programs are designed to fill in the gap.
1/27/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Broad worries about potential health care loss
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Though "Obamacare" still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation's long-running political standoff over health care.

A new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 56 percent of U.S. adults are "extremely" or "very" concerned that many will lose health insurance if the health overhaul is repealed. That includes more than 8 in 10 Democrats, nearly half of independents, and more than 1 in 5 Republicans. Another 45 percent of Republicans say they're "somewhat" concerned.
1/18/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Americans of all stripes say fix health care
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Sylvia Douglas twice voted for President Barack Obama and last year cast a ballot for Democrat Hillary Clinton. But when it comes to "Obamacare," she now sounds like President-elect Donald Trump. This makes her chuckle amid the serious choices she faces every month between groceries, electricity and paying a health insurance bill that has jumped by nearly $400.

"It's a universal thing, nobody likes it," Douglas, a licensed practical nurse in Huntsville, Alabama, said of Obama's signature law. "They need to fix it with whatever works, but not make more of a mess like they have now."

That Americans agree on much of anything is remarkable after a presidential race that ripped open the nation's economic, political and cultural divisions. But on the brink of the Trump presidency, a new poll finds ample accord across those divisions on the need to do something about health care in the United States.
1/17/2017 Poll: Young Americans fear they will be worse off post-Trump
​NEW YORK (AP) — As Donald Trump approaches his inauguration, young Americans have a deeply pessimistic view about his incoming administration, with young blacks, Latinos and Asian Americans particularly concerned about what's to come in the next four years.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of Americans aged 18 to 30, which found that the country's young adults are more likely to expect they'll be worse off at the end of Trump's first term than better off. Such young Americans are also far more likely to think Trump will divide the country than unite it, by a 60 percent to 19 percent margin.
1/17/2017 Poll: Young Americans doubt media's ability to cover Trump
​NEW YORK (AP) — Most young Americans are concerned about the media's ability to report on Donald Trump and his efforts to obstruct coverage of his administration, and most think it's at least somewhat likely he will make it harder for Americans to express dissent.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of Americans aged 18 to 30, nearly two-thirds of whom say they're either very (25 percent) or somewhat (38 percent) concerned about Trump trying to impede journalists as they report on his incoming administration.
1/9/2017 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​AP-NORC Poll: Obama won nation's approval, didn't unite it
​WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans feel Barack Obama's presidency divided the country than feel it brought people together, a new poll shows. Yet he leaves office held in high esteem by a solid majority.

Eight years after Obama's historic election, just 27 percent see the U.S. as more united as a result of his presidency, according to an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll conducted after the 2016 election. Far more — 44 percent — say it's more divided.
12/27/2016 Growing number of Americans are retiring outside the US
​Newly widowed, Kay McCowen quit her job, sold her house, applied for Social Security and retired to Mexico. It was a move she and her husband, Mel, had discussed before he passed away in 2012.

"I wanted to find a place where I could afford to live off my Social Security," she said. "The weather here is so perfect, and it's a beautiful place."

She is among a growing number of Americans who are retiring outside the United States. The number grew 17 percent between 2010 and 2015 and is expected to increase over the next 10 years as more baby boomers retire.
12/6/2016 ​​​​​​Poll: Racial vulnerability linked to youth vote choice
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Among the youngest white adult Americans, feelings of racial and economic vulnerability appear to be closely connected to their support for Donald Trump in last month's election.

That's according to an analysis of a new GenForward poll of Americans between the ages of 18 and 30. Other surveys of white adults of all ages have found a similar pattern.​
10/24/2016 ​​​​​​​​​​​Poll: Young voters now coming through for Hillary Clinton

WASHINGTON (AP) — Liane Golightly has finally decided who she'll vote for on Election Day. Hillary Clinton is not a choice the 30-year-old Republican would have predicted, nor one that excites her. But the former supporter of Ohio Gov. John Kasich says it's the only choice she can make.

"I kind of wish it were somebody else, somebody that I could really get behind 100 percent," said Golightly, an educator from Monroe, Michigan. She's voting for Clinton, she said, only because she can't stomach "childish" Donald Trump.

Like Golightly, many young voters are coming over to Clinton in the closing stretch of the 2016 campaign, according to a new GenForward poll of Americans 18 to 30.

10/24/2016 For some low-income workers, retirement is only a dream

​CHICAGO (AP) — It was a striking image. A photo of an 89-year-old man hunched over, struggling to push his cart with frozen treats. Fidencio Sanchez works long hours every day selling the treats because he couldn't afford to retire. The photo and his story went viral and thousands of people donated more than $384,000 for his retirement.

10/14/2016 Nearly half of young adults lack retirement savings, pension
​NEW YORK (AP) — Young Americans with even just $1 saved for retirement are ahead of the pack.

Forty-eight percent of all Americans aged 18 to 30 have zero in retirement savings and no access to a traditional pension, according to a GenForward poll by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
10/9/2016 GenForward Poll: Half of black youth face job discrimination
WASHINGTON (AP) — Qymana Botts saw white colleagues with the same amount of experience getting promoted to cashier ahead of her at the Indiana discount store where she worked. When she asked her supervisors why, they told her she didn't project the image that they wanted from their cashiers: straight hair — not her natural Afro — and more makeup.
 
"When it came time for promotions and raises and things like that, I was told I need to fit into a more European kind of appearance," Botts said of her 2010 experience. "They wanted me to straighten my hair, but I wasn't willing to do that."
 
Botts, 25, is not alone.
 
Almost half of young African-Americans say they've experienced racial discrimination while looking for a job and while on the job, and one-third of young women of all races and ethnicities say they've faced employment-related gender discrimination.​
10/5/2016 Black, Latino youth less likely to get money from folks
​WASHINGTON (AP) — More young blacks and Latinos feel that they can't depend on family to help them with financial needs, from big-ticket items like college tuition to smaller expenses, than do whites or Asians, according to a new GenForward poll.
 
And more than half of millennials overall say an unexpected bill of $1,000 would cause them financial difficulty, a sign that young Americans are still struggling years after the end of the recession, according to the poll released this week.
10/3/2016 Young adults prefer Clinton on income gap, divide on jobs

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Young adults are more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump on handling wages, income inequality and personal finances, but they're divided on which candidate would better handle job creation, a new GenForward poll shows.

Young Hispanics, blacks and Asian-Americans favor Clinton on all four economic issues, but young whites are more likely to favor Trump on both job creation and their personal finances.

GenForward is a survey of adults age 18 to 30 by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The first-of-its-kind poll pays special attention to the voices of young adults of color, highlighting how race and ethnicity shape the opinions of a new generation.
10/3/2016 Among young voters, Obama's popularity may not transfer
​DURHAM, North Carolina (AP) — Paulos Muruts is set to cast his first presidential ballot for Hillary Clinton — if he makes it to the ballot box.
 
"I might need someone on Election Day to actually convince me to go out and vote," says the 19-year-old Duke University student, arguing that the Democratic nominee "has the experience" and "exudes the right temperament" but "doesn't inspire excitement."

Yet mention Clinton's would-be predecessor and Muruts' eyes light up.
 
"Love President Obama," he says. "He's got swagger."
 
Muruts represents a frustrating political reality for Clinton in her matchup against Republican nominee Donald Trump: She'll fare far better on Election Day among voters age 18-30, but she could fall short of Obama's totals and turnouts that drove his national victories in 2008 and 2012, a new GenForward survey suggests.
10/1/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Half of Trump backers don't trust vote count

NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump is making the unprecedented assertion that the general election "is going to be rigged," and many people who are drawn to his presidential campaign have major doubts about the accuracy of the Nov. 8 vote.

Only about one-third of Republicans say they have a great deal or quite a bit of confidence that votes on Election Day will be counted fairly, according to a poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

9/24/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Most in US frustrated over presidential race

WASHINGTON (AP) — Carol Jones knows what she wants to hear Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump discuss during their first televised debate: education and jobs. She's far from sure which candidate will earn her vote on Election Day.

"All we see is the cat fighting," says the Shirley, Arkansas, retired substitute teacher. At Monday's debate, the 70-year-old says, "they need to talk about their programs ... but I don't think they will."

A majority of Americans, like Jones, say they're frustrated, angry — or both — with the 2016 presidential election, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Most Americans aren't feeling proud or hopeful about the race, and half feel helpless, the results find. Majorities of Americans want more focus on issues that are important to them, starting with health care, Social Security, education, terrorism and homeland security.

9/14/2016 ​​​​​​​​​​​​Poll: Americans favor slightly higher bills to fight warming​
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans are willing to pay a little more each month to fight global warming — but only a tiny bit, according to a new poll. Still, environmental policy experts hail that as a hopeful sign.

Seventy-one percent want the federal government to do something about global warming, including 6 percent who think the government should act even though they are not sure that climate change is happening, according to a poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago.
9/8/2016 Young voters from newer immigrant families lean more liberal

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young Hispanic and Asian-Americans who are immigrants or have an immigrant parent are more likely to be liberal in their views on politics and immigration than those with families who have been in United States longer, a new GenForward poll shows.

Eighty-seven percent of those age 18 to 30 who are immigrants or who have parents who are immigrants support allowing those who were brought to the United States illegally as children to stay legally, while 72 percent of those whose families have been in the U.S. longer agree. Eighty-five percent of first and second generation Latino and Asian immigrants and 74 percent of those who are third generation or greater oppose building a border wall.

9/5/2016 Poll: Support for Black Lives Matter grows among white youth

WASHINGTON (AP) — Support for the Black Lives Matter movement has increased among young white adults, according to a poll that suggests a majority of white, black, Asian and Hispanic young adults now support the movement calling for accountability for police in the deaths of African-Americans.

Fifty-one percent of white adults between the ages of 18 and 30 say in a GenForward poll they now strongly or somewhat support Black Lives Matter, a 10-point increase since June, while 42 percent said they do not support the movement.

9/5/2016 Young whites divide on handling violence by, against police

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people across racial and ethnic lines are more likely to say they trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump to handle instances of police violence against African-Americans. But young whites are more likely to say they trust Trump to handle violence committed against the police.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of young adults age 18 to 30. The poll is conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The first-of-its-kind poll pays special attention to the voices of young adults of color, highlighting how race and ethnicity shape the opinions of a new generation.

9/2/2016 Poll: Young adults divided on immigration, border control

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Young Hispanics, Asian-Americans and African-Americans are much more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump to deal with immigrants living in the United States illegally. But young whites tend to trust Trump more on issues related to illegal immigration, including securing the border.

Among young people overall, 47 percent say they think Trump would better handle securing the border, 26 percent say Clinton would, and 18 percent say neither would.

That's according to a new GenForward survey of adults age 18 to 30 by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. There's division on which candidate would better handle immigrants in the country now without permission, with 39 percent choosing Clinton, 38 percent Trump and 14 percent neither.

8/31/2016 Poll: Most young adults say police treat some differently

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Across racial and ethnic groups, most young Americans think police treat some groups of people differently than others, according to a new GenForward poll.

The poll shows that most think African-Americans, Latinos, the poor and immigrants are more likely to be mistreated. It also shows that young blacks are especially likely to say they've experienced arrest, harassment or violence by police.

8/31/2016 GenForward Poll: Young black adults less trusting of police

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young Americans are about equally likely to say they've had an encounter with police, but young black adults are much more likely than whites to say they've been arrested, harassed or know someone who has been, a new GenForward poll said Wednesday.

Twenty-eight percent of blacks say they have been arrested after encounters with law enforcement, 24 percent say they've been personally harassed by police, and 53 percent say they know someone who has.

8/25/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Gender matters, but does it hurt or help?
​DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — There's no "glass ceiling" keeping a woman from the presidential nomination anymore, but most Americans still think Hillary Clinton's gender will influence the November election. They're just divided on whether it's more of a curse than a blessing.

According to a new poll from the Associated-Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, most Americans see Clinton's gender playing a role in the campaign, with 37 percent saying her gender will help her chances of being elected president, 29 percent arguing it will hurt her, and 33 percent thinking it won't make a difference.
8/24/2016 ​​​​​​​​​Lo que más temen los hispanos de la vejez (What most Hispanics fear of old age)​
El deterioro de su capacidad mental y perder su independencia es lo que más les inquieta a los hispanos. También temen dejarle deudas a sus familias.

Estos son los resultados de una encuesta que este miércoles publicó la Associated Press y el Norc Center for Public Affair Research de la Universidad de Chicago, llamada “Cuidado a largo plazo en Estados Unidos: Cómo los hispanos esperan envejecer”.​
8/9/2016 Poll: Young Americans favor LGBT rights on adoption, more
WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people in America overwhelmingly support LGBT rights when it comes to policies on employment, health care and adoption, according to a new survey.

The GenForward survey of Americans ages 18-30 found that support for those policies has increased over the past two years, especially among young whites. But relatively few of these young adults consider rights for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender to be among the top issues facing the country.​
8/8/2016 Poll: Young Americans fear US, foreign-inspired extremists
​BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The threat of violence by people inspired by foreign extremists invokes fear in a majority of young Americans across racial groups. But for young people of color, particularly African-Americans, that fear is matched or surpassed by worries about violence from white extremists.

A new GenForward poll of Americans age 18-30 shows widespread anxiety among young people about attacks from both inside and outside the United States.
8/6/2016 Poll: Young adults support new efforts to curb gun violence
​​CHICAGO (AP) -- LaShun Roy supports a ban on semi-automatic weapons and more comprehensive background checks. But the 21-year-old gun owner from rural Texas doesn't consider gun-control measures a top priority in this year's elections.

For Keionna Cottrell, a 24-year-old who lives on Chicago's South Side and whose brother was shot and killed this year in another Illinois city, few things are more important than limiting access to guns.
8/5/2016 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Poll: Most young whites think Clinton broke law
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Young Americans are divided over Hillary Clinton's handling of her email account while she was secretary of state, with most young whites saying she intentionally broke the law and young people of color more likely to give Clinton the benefit of the doubt.
 
The new GenForward poll of young Americans age 18-30 also finds both Clinton and Donald Trump viewed negatively by a majority of those polled.
8/5/2016 Poll: Most young Americans say parties don't represent them

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most young Americans say the Republican and Democratic parties don't represent them, a critical data point after a year of ferocious presidential primaries that forced partisans on both sides to confront what — and whom — they stand for.

That's according to a new GenForward poll that shows the disconnect holds true across racial and ethnic groups, with just 28 percent of young adults overall saying the two major parties do a good job of representing the American people.

8/4/2016 Poll: Police harassment familiar to young blacks, Hispanics
​DETROIT (AP) — Crystal Webb cringes whenever a patrol car appears in her rearview mirror. She also never wants to see the inside of a police station again.
 
Her personal experience with police, plus recent fatal shootings of unarmed black men by white officers, has led the Apple Valley, California, mother of two to ask: Who are the good guys and who are bad?

"You are the people I'm supposed to go to when I'm in trouble," Webb says of police.

Two-thirds of young African-Americans and 4 in 10 Hispanics say that they or someone they know has experienced violence or harassment at the hands of the police, according to a new GenForward poll. That includes about 2 in 10 in each group who say that was a personal experience, including about 3 in 10 black men who say the same.
8/3/2016 America in one word? 'Free,' 'great,' or 'divided,' 'broken'

NEW YORK (AP) — Free and great, or divided and confused. Diverse and powerful, or troubled and broken. In search of a single word encapsulating their country at this moment, Americans offered pollsters a lexicon reflecting both hope and dissonance.

The most-uttered word from about 1,000 responses to the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey was "freedom," with "free" not far behind at No. 4. "Great" took second place — and "good," ''powerful," ''wonderful" and "awesome" also occupied the top tier. But crowding the list were entries mirroring national angst.

8/1/2016 AP-NORC poll: Regardless of vote, Americans see division

​​NEW YORK (AP) -- Neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump is seen as likely to unify the U.S. if elected, but pessimism about the Republican candidate is far greater, according to a poll released Monday that reflects deep division in the country.

The survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found 73 percent of Americans believe Trump will further divide the country, compared with 43 percent saying that about Clinton.​
7/20/2016 Kids leaving home doesn't always lead to parents saving more

CHICAGO (AP) — Raising kids costs a lot of money, so when they finally strike out on their own it stands to reason that parents would have more money to spend, save or invest. How they spend that money can have large consequences for their retirement security.

A report by Boston College's Center for Retirement Research found that empty nesters do increase savings, but the increases are "extremely small," suggesting that baby boomers may be losing out on a critical opportunity to save for retirement.

7/14/2016 States require insurance companies to locate beneficiaries
​CHICAGO (AP) — Beneficiaries of unclaimed life insurance policies already have received billions of dollars — and others could be in store for some unexpected cash — the result of state actions forcing companies to locate heirs and pay them the money they are owed.

Nearly two dozen states have passed laws requiring companies to search for beneficiaries. Illinois is the latest to consider a version of the legislation.​
7/13/2016 Poll: In tumultuous summer, young Americans in a dour mood
​​SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- In a summer of political and racial tumult, young Americans are in a dour mood: pessimistic about the fairness of their economic system, questioning the greatness of the United States and deeply skeptical of the way the nation picks its leaders.

A new poll of young people between the ages of 18 and 30 finds that an overwhelming 90 percent think the two-party political system has real - though fixable - problems or that it is "seriously broken." Three-quarters believe the U.S. is "falling behind" or "failing" as a nation.
7/13/2016 Poll: Most young people dislike GOP's Trump, say he's racist
​NEW YORK (AP) -- Donald Trump is wildly unpopular among young adults, in particular young people of color, and nearly two-thirds of Americans between the ages of 18 and 30 believe the presumptive Republican nominee is racist.

That's the finding of a new GenForward poll that also found just 19 percent of young people have a favorable opinion of Trump compared to the three-quarters of young adults who hold a dim view of the New York billionaire.
7/12/2016 Poll: After education, young people diverge on 2016 issues
​WASHINGTON (AP) -- When it comes to picking a new president, young people in America are united in saying education is what matters most. But there's a wide split in what else will drive their votes.

​For African-American adults between the ages of 18 and 30, racism is nearly as important as education. For young Hispanics, it's immigration. And for whites and Asian-Americans in the millennial generation, it's economic growth.
7/12/2016 Poll: Clinton struggles to make inroads with young Americans
​WASHINGTON (AP) -- Hillary Clinton is struggling to make inroads among young Americans who overwhelmingly supported Bernie Sanders during the Democratic presidential primary, a worrisome sign as she tries to reassemble the coalition that twice propelled Barack Obama into the White House.

Opinions of Clinton among young Americans vary by race and ethnicity, according to a new GenForward poll of adults ages 18 to 30. The majority of the nation's younger blacks and Asian-Americans have a favorable impression of Clinton, but the presumptive Democratic nominee struggles with whites and Hispanics.
7/10/2016 Women more likely than men to face poverty during retirement

​CHICAGO (AP) — During their working years, women tend to earn less than men, and when they retire, they're more likely to live in poverty.

These are women who raised children and cared for sick and elderly family members, often taking what savings and income they do have and spending it on things besides their own retirement security.

6/20/2016 Seasonal farmworkers face battle to get health insurance
​DUNN, N.C. (AP) — Some seasonal agricultural workers were finishing a meal after a long day of planting sweet potato seeds when Julie Pittman pulled into to their camp.

Up since dawn, they had worked through an 80-degree day that was just beginning to cool off. Now, Pittman, a paralegal with the Farmworker Unit of Legal Aid of North Carolina, wanted to get their attention.

The health care law passed in 2010 requires you to have health insurance, she told them in Spanish. If you don't get it, she said, you could be fined.
6/1/2016 Poll: People unsure about ability to pay for long-term care

​CHICAGO (AP) — Demand for long-term care is expected to increase as the nation ages, but the majority of Americans 40 and older lack confidence in their ability to pay for it.

The annual cost of long-term care expenses range from $17,680 for adult day care to more than $92,000 for a private room in a nursing home, according to Genworth Financial.

Yet an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey finds that a third of Americans 40 and older have done no planning for their own-long term care needs, such as setting aside money to pay for a home aide or to help with daily activities or a room in a nursing home.

5/31/2016 AP-NORC poll: Americans want nomination system changed

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Bernie Sanders' pitch for changing the way presidential candidates are chosen appears to have broad public support.

As the tortured primary season concludes, Americans say in a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that they have little faith in the Democratic or Republican system for selecting a presidential candidate. They prefer open primaries to those that are closed to all but party members, like primaries instead of caucuses and oppose the party insiders known as superdelegates, who have a substantial say in the Democratic race.

5/30/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Voters feel disconnected, helpless in 2016

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans and Democrats feel a massive disconnect with their political parties and helpless about the presidential election.

That's according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, which helps explain the rise of outsider candidates Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders and suggests challenges ahead for fractured parties that must come together to win this fall.

5/28/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Interest, not excitement in White House race

ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Mary Heintzelman shakes her head in disgust over the presidential election.

"I don't think we have a candidate that's really suitable to be president in either party," says Heintzelman, an administrative assistant from Whitehall, Pennsylvania. Her son suggests she write in a candidate when she votes in November, but the 68-year-old says despondently, "I don't even know who to write in."

5/28/2016 AP-NORC Poll finds bare confidence in government, elections

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Few Americans have much confidence in the U.S. political system, the government in general, or in either political party.

Most say they're interested in the 2016 presidential election, but they also feel frustrated, helpless and even angry with the way the election is going, a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows.

5/26/2016 Many opt to take Social Security before full retirement age

​CHICAGO (AP) — Taking Social Security benefits early comes with a price, yet more than 4 in 10 Americans who are 50 and over say they'll dip into the program before reaching full retirement age.

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Thursday found that 44 percent report Social Security will be their biggest source of income during their retirement years.

5/20/2016 Poll shows strong support for paid family leave programs

​CHICAGO (AP) _ Time off from work to care for a child or relative is codified in federal law. Now, an overwhelming majority of Americans 40 and older want that time away from the job to be paid.

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Friday said 72 percent support paid family leave. Democrats were more likely to back it, but Republicans also expressed strong support. Overall, support was stronger among people age 40-64 and among women.

5/19/2016 Poll: Two-thirds of US would struggle to cover $1,000 crisis

​NEW YORK (AP) — Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years after the Great Recession, Americans' finances remain precarious as ever.

These difficulties span all incomes, according to the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Three-quarters of people in households making less than $50,000 a year and two-thirds of those making between $50,000 and $100,000 would have difficulty coming up with $1,000 to cover an unexpected bill.

5/18/2016 Poll: Americans more upbeat about own finances than economy

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an election race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national economy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

Just 42 percent of adults describe the U.S. economy as good, according to a survey released Wednesday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But two-thirds say their own households are faring well.

5/10/2016 Poll: Age, income factors in staying with single employer

​CHICAGO (AP) — A new poll says more than 40 percent of America's baby boomers stayed with their employer for more than 20 years. But it's unlikely that their children or grandchildren will experience the same job tenure.

The survey of more than 1,000 Americans 50 and older by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that 41 percent of those employed workers have spent two decades with the same company, including 18 percent who've stayed at least 30 years.

5/2/2016 Nursing homes starting to offer more individualized menus

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — On a recent Thursday, the staff at Sunny Vista Living Center in Colorado Springs bustled in the kitchen. The phone rang with a last minute order as Chris Willard tended to a large pot of Thai-style soup with fresh ginger, vegetables and thin-sliced beef.

It was a special meal for a woman of Asian descent who didn't like any of the dozen choices on the menu.

4/15/2016 AP-NORC Poll: That's rude: More say GOP is discourteous

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ask Americans about bad manners in the 2016 presidential campaign and the conversation shifts immediately to Donald Trump, the GOP front-runner who has branded his critics, "little," ''lyin," ''low-energy" and worse.

"I don't recall anyone stirring up as much of a fuss as Mr. Trump," says Sidney Waldman, 81, a retired book store owner in Key West, Florida. "He just does not need to say things the way he says them. It may get attention now, but he is going to be remembered in a negative way."

4/7/2016 Poll: Some key gaps in Americans' knowledge about Zika virus

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans don't know a lot about the Zika virus that is linked to birth defects and creeping steadily closer to the U.S., according to a new poll that found about 4 in 10 say they've heard little to nothing about the mosquito-borne threat.

Even among people who've been following the Zika saga at least a little, many aren't sure whether there's a vaccine or treatment — not yet — or if there's any way the virus can spread other than through mosquito bites.

Still, with mosquito season fast approaching, more than half of the population supports a variety of efforts to control summer swarms — from spraying pesticides to releasing genetically modified mosquitoes, says the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

4/4/2016 New push to keep seniors in home, community-based programs

CHICAGO (AP) — The federal government is pushing states to keep more low-income seniors out of nursing homes and, instead, enroll them in home and community-based programs.

The shift comes as demand for long-term care is rising. By 2050, the number of people older than 85 is expected to triple to more than 18 million. These seniors tend to have the highest disability rate and the greatest need for long-term care.

3/30/2016 Caregivers of people with dementia face financial hardships

​CHICAGO (AP) — Many relatives and friends providing financial support or care to people with dementia have dipped into their retirement savings, cut back on spending and sold assets to pay for expenses tied to the disease, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Alzheimer's Association.

3/29/2016 For some, leaving workforce continues years after retiring

​BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — The transition from employment to retirement used to be marked by a date on a calendar, along with some sheet cake, and a maybe a gold watch. Those days are long gone for most workers in the United States.

3/25/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans see drugs as a big problem

Sharon Johnson calls herself an addict, although she's been sober for three years now. She started by smoking pot and eventually moved to crack cocaine. Her daughter has tried heroin and "I believe I'm going to pull her out of the gutter someday," Johnson laments.

Johnson has seen firsthand the ravages of drug abuse reflected in a national Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll. Whether it's alcohol or illegal drugs such as heroin and cocaine, a majority of Americans say it's a problem and that more needs to be done to address it.

3/15/2016 La mayoría de los hispanos en EEUU no se prepara para la vejez

Más de la mitad de los hispanos mayores de 40 años cree que necesitará asistencia médica y cuidado a largo plazo en el futuro, pero muy pocos han hecho algo para prepararse para ese momento.

Esos son los resultados de una encuesta que este martes devela la Associated Press y el Norc Center for Public Affair Research de la Universidad de Chicago, llamada “Expectativas y planificación para el cuidado a largo plazo entre los hispanos en Estados Unidos”.

2/23/2016 AP Poll: Jobs, Social Security are key for next president

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Here's something that Democrats, Republicans and independents agree on. When it comes to the economy, they all want to protect Social Security and lower unemployment.

That's where their similarities end.

Beyond the top two issues, Americans' lists of top economic concerns for the next president are more fractured, according to a poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

2/20/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Income gap, Wall Street rules big for Dems

​LAS VEGAS (AP) — Most Democrats consider income inequality a very important issue and half of them think tougher regulations of the financial markets imposed after the 2008 financial crisis did not go far enough, according to a poll released as Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders enter a crucial stretch for the party's nomination.

The poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research suggested support within the party for Sanders' fiery calls to increase regulations on Wall Street banks and address wide gaps between the nation's wealthy and poor. Most Democrats — and Republicans — support increasing the federal minimum wage, although they favor more incremental steps backed by Clinton, the poll found.

2/18/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Pope Francis popular, but influence limited

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pope Francis' comments Thursday that Donald Trump is "not a Christian" if he supports a wall along the Mexican border put the Republican presidential contender in the uncomfortable position of being pitted against a more popular political figure, according to recent polling on the pope's standing among Americans and American Catholics.

But the poll, conducted in October by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, finds the pope to be a relatively unknown quantity to many Americans and suggests his clout when it comes to influencing American political opinions may be limited. The poll followed the pope's U.S. visit in September.

2/17/2016 For some, desire to work past 65 can often be problematic

YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) — Earl Johnston was 12 when he got his first job, a paper route that he quickly expanded by "buying out" additional routes from other, less industrious boys.

After high school, he enrolled in a program to become an industrial electrician.

"With that journeyman's card in my back pocket, I had never had trouble finding work — ever," he said.

2/16/2016 More grandparents taking on parental role for grandchildren
CHICAGO (AP) — When Debra Aldridge became her grandson's primary caregiver, she was making $7.50 per hour as a cook. The alternative for the newborn, she was told, was to put him up for adoption.
1/23/2016 AP Poll: Public doubts Washington's problem-solving ability

​WASHINGTON (AP) — As the first voting nears in the presidential race, most Americans have little to no confidence in the federal government to confront what they see as the country's most important priorities, according to a national survey.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll, conducted in December, found more than 6 in 10 respondents expressed only slight confidence — or none at all — that the federal government can make progress on the problems facing the nation in 2016.

12/30/2015 AP-NORC Poll: Christian-Muslim split on religious freedom

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans place a higher priority on preserving the religious freedom of Christians than for other faith groups, ranking Muslims as the least deserving of the protections, according to a new survey.

Solid majorities said it was extremely or very important for the U.S. to uphold religious freedom in general. However, the percentages varied dramatically when respondents were asked about specific faith traditions, according to a poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

12/30/2015 AP-NORC Poll: Online surveillance is OK for most

​WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans say they support warrantless government surveillance of the Internet communications of U.S. citizens, according to a new poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

12/16/2015 Tips for caregivers traveling with elderly, frail relatives

​​CHICAGO (AP) — Nancy Powers had to adjust her travel routine when her best friend and travel partner, Phyllis Wesley, was diagnosed with a degenerative brain condition that affects her speech and comprehension.

12/8/2015 AP-NORC Poll: Americans wary of hidden political donors

​The views on disclosure cut across party lines, with 78 percent of Democrats and Republicans alike favoring a requirement that donor names be made public, according to a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research released this week.

12/6/2015 AP Poll: Ecology, religion a natural mix for some Americans

​WASHINGTON (AP) — As a group, the most religious Americans are less likely than others in the U.S. to trust the science of global warming. Yet one group of faithful Americans not only believes the threat is real, but also feels obliged to help save Earth's climate, an analysis by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and Yale University shows.

11/23/2015 Older workers seeking options for reducing hours on the job

​Roberton Williams' plan was to retire on his government pension and take a part-time job to make up the difference in salary. It didn't quite work out that way.

Williams, 68, did retire but then started another full-time job with the Tax Policy Center, a Washington think tank.

"The plan was to work full time just until I got my feet wet," Williams said. "But, I ended up working full time for the next nine years."

He's far from an aberration. Many aging baby boomers are caught between a desire to work less and a labor market that just isn't ready to let them go.

 The AP-NORC Center in the Media

On this page you will find the Associated Press stories based upon research done by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Each story ran on each of the AP media platforms, which means that they appeared in newspapers, on radio and TV stations, and online across the country and throughout the world.

It is estimated that approximately one-half the world’s population receives news and information from The Associated Press each day, which suggests the reach and penetration of each of these stories.

 Media Contact

Ray Boyer
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