SharePoint

Projects

The AP-NORC Center develops projects around a variety of key issues and newsworthy topics with the potential for social impact. Examples include, but are not limited to education, health care, race relations, unemployment and poverty, and international research. With these social, political, and cultural trends in mind, the AP-NORC Center has executeda number of projects and research programs.


GenForward October  2016

The first of its kind monthly survey of racially and ethnically diverse young adults conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.


Views on the American Election Process and Perceptions of Voter Fraud

A majority of the public think there are moderate levels of fraud or more in American elections, though most have at least some confidence in the accuracy of the final vote count of the upcoming presidential election, according to a national survey of 1,022 adults conducted in September by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research using AmeriSpeak®. The survey finds a majority think new voting technology implemented after the 2000 presidential election has improved the accuracy of vote counts, though many have concerns about the vulnerability of the country’s voting system to hackers. It also finds that both early voting and voter identification laws enjoy widespread support among the public.


Americans Want an Issues-Based Campaign, but Don’t Always Agree on which Issues Matter Most

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak®, conducted a national survey of 1,022 adults in September, finding that most Americans are interested in, but frustrated and angered by, the 2016 presidential election. Many think the campaign is focusing too much on the personal qualities of the candidates and not enough on the policies they care about or the candidates’ qualifications for office. The survey also asked Americans which issues are most important to them, finding that the top issues to the public are health care, Social Security, education, and terrorism, though differences emerge in priorities along party lines.

Energy and Climate Change in the 2016 Election

The Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago and The AP-NORC Center conducted a national AmeriSpeak® survey of 1,096 adults, examining Americans’ attitudes on energy, climate change, and government action ahead of the upcoming presidential election. The study finds that these issues are important for about half of likely voters as they cast their ballot this November, with majorities of Americans supporting government action on climate change domestically and in international efforts..


Hillary Clinton’s Candidacy and the State of Gender Discrimination in the United States

A national survey of 1,096 adults conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research using AmeriSpeak finds that, even as Hillary Clinton has become the first woman to be a major political party’s presidential nominee, women continue to face obstacles in politics and the workplace. Though large majorities of Americans regard women political leaders as equal to men and think a woman would be up to the challenges a president may face, about half see fewer opportunities in politics for women than men and many expect Clinton’s gender to hurt her chances in November.


Divided America: Perceptions of What Unites and Divides the Country

A nationwide survey of 1,008 adults conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, investigates the public’s perceptions of unity and division within the United States. The survey finds that while most Americans believe that the U.S. is divided when it comes to the most important values, most also say they do share important values with their neighbors. In addition, most say the media and politicians focus too much on divisions.

The Frustrated Public: Views of the 2016 Campaign, the Parties, and the Electoral Process

A nationwide survey of 1,060 adults conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, finds that Americans across political parties are frustrated about this year’s presidential election. Nine in 10 lack confidence in the country’s political system, and among a normally polarized electorate, there are few partisan differences in the public’s lack of faith in the political parties, the nominating process, and the branches of government.

   

Working Longer: Aging, Work, and Retirement Planning in America

With funding from The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a nationwide survey of 1,075 adults age 50 and older on how they are preparing for the changing landscape of work and retirement in the United States. This study expands on the findings from the 2013 Working Longer study. The first of the two 2016 reports provides insights into older workers’ efforts to improve their job skills and adjust their working plans as they age. The second report provides details on older Americans’ attitudes and planning behaviors about retirement.

 

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,008 adults to explore Americans’ attitudes about the national economy and their own personal financial situation. The results reveal that while two-thirds of Americans describe their own finances as good, 57 percent give negative marks to the national economy, and few Americans say the economy has bounced back from the 2008 financial crisis.


Rude Behavior in Everyday Life and on the Campaign Trail

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,004 adults to investigate how the public feels about the manners of their fellow Americans and the tone of today’s political campaigns. The study shows that many Americans feel that people have become more ill-mannered in the past 20 or 30 years. It also finds that even with impolite behavior and speech among ordinary Americans on the rise, a majority of the public says that the disrespectful tone of political campaigns these days surpasses the level of rudeness in everyday life.
 

The Zika Virus: Americans' Awareness and Opinions of the U.S. Response

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,004 adults to explore Americans’ awareness of, and knowledge about, the Zika virus. The results reveal that 40 percent of Americans have heard only a little or nothing at all about the virus. Those who are aware of the virus are generally informed about how Zika is spread, but many lack information about the availability of treatments, vaccines, and tests for the virus.
 

American Attitudes toward Substance Use in the United States

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,042 adults to explore how Americans evaluate the problem of substance use in their communities, including a detailed examination of attitudes toward the growing epidemic of prescription painkillers and heroin abuse. The results reveal that most Americans say at least one type of substance abuse is a serious problem in their community and many have a relative or close friend with substance abuse issues. They also show that the public thinks more should be done to address the problem of substance abuse in their area, with a particular emphasis on improving treatment.  


The Importance of Economic Issues

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,008 adults to gain insights into Americans’ evaluations of the economy and how they rate the importance of specific economic issues like reducing unemployment and raising the federal minimum wage. The results reveal that the public is split on how well the economy is performing. They also show that issues like raising the minimum wage, protecting the future of Social Security, and reforming welfare matter quite a bit to a majority of Americans.

 
  
American Attitudes toward the Pope Following His Visit to the United States

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide poll of 1,058 adults to gain insights into Americans’ attitudes toward the papal visit to America. The study reveals that Pope Francis’s call to action on climate change last summer made little impression on American attitudes toward global warming.
 
Americans' Priorities for 2016

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,042 adults to assess what the public views as the top issues facing the United States in 2016. The results reveal that the public has a variety of top concerns that they would like the government to be working on in the coming year. Yet, Americans have little confidence in the federal government’s ability to resolve any of the country’s important problems.
 
 
Americans Evaluate the Balance between Security and Civil Liberties

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide survey of 1,042 adults to gain insights into Americans’ views on the appropriate balance between maintaining security and protecting civil liberties. The results reveal that in the aftermath of recent high-profile attacks on Western targets by Islamic extremists, fear of terrorism has grown while the public remains divided on whether the struggle against terrorism is worth the loss of some rights. 
 
 
Americans' Views on Money in Politics

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, using AmeriSpeak, conducted a nationwide poll of 1,011 adults to gain insights into Americans’ views on campaign finance. The study reveals that most Americans say campaign contributions directly influence politicians, yet there is little encouragement from the public to change the current system.

 


 American Attitudes about Global Warming and Energy Policy

The inaugural poll of Americans’ environmental attitudes, a collaboration between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, reveals that contrary to common rhetoric, the American public is not simply polarized into pro- and anti-environment groups. Instead, the study identifies nine distinct types of Americans, each with a unique understanding of the environment, perspectives on key environmental issues, and different environmental behaviors. It also finds that Americans’ environmental attitudes are partly motivated by political ideology and religion, but are also rooted in how individuals perceive, interact with, and experience nature.
 
 
Speaking Out on Global Warming: Public Attitudes toward the Papal Encyclical on Climate Change

In collaboration with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey using AmeriSpeak on their views about the pope’s stand on global warming.
 

Global Issues: Americans’ Foreign Policy Priorities

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll found a public overwhelmingly in support of diplomatic efforts to resolve different types of global crises and a substantial number are also positive about the appropriateness of economic measures. However, many people question the wisdom of some military interventions by the United States.


Law Enforcement and Violence: The Divide between Black and White Americans

The difficult relationship between the police and blacks in the United States is evident from the results of a recent Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey. The poll highlights a number of racial divisions in Americans' attitudes toward law enforcement and the criminal justice system. However, the survey finds agreement across racial groups on many of the causes of police violence.
A recent survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research offers policymakers around the world a unique understanding of Russian attitudes and sheds light on public sentiment toward the country’s foreign affairs. The poll finds Russians’ views of the United States and President Barack Obama are extremely unfavorable and have grown more negative in the last two years. Russians see China as an ally and the United States and the European Union as adversaries; however, most Russians believe their country should make at least some effort to improve relations with the U.S. and the E.U. Looking at social issues, a majority of Russians do not think society should accept LGBT people, and the public has grown less tolerant of LGBT people in the last two years.

 
 
General Social Survey: Chronicling Changes in American Society

This report involves a collaboration between the AP-NORC Center and GSS staff, and it highlights major findings from the 2014 study across a number of GSS topics.


Public Opinion in Russia: Russians’ Attitudes on Economic and Domestic Issues

A new survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research provides policymakers with a rare, in-depth examination of public attitudes in Russia and provides important context for understanding Russian society and politics. The poll finds President Vladimir Putin is extremely popular, and most Russians believe their country is headed in the right direction. Although few Russians say the country’s economy is in good condition, most report their families’ finances are in fair shape. Many Russians believe economic sanctions from Europe and the United States are hurting the country’s economy, but most favor Russia helping Ukrainians who want to break off from the Kiev government.
 
Employer Perspectives on the Health Insurance Market: A Survey of Businesses in the United States

A new survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research provides timely data on the quality information employers offering insurance do, or in many cases, do not, use when evaluating plans, and how employers in general view the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as businesses consider changing employee benefits. It shows that many employers in the United States that offer health insurance to employees are unfamiliar with objective metrics of health plan quality information, and most consider costs both to their organization and their employees as important factors when selecting plans. The survey also finds that employers are looking to the ACA as they make significant decisions on the benefits they offer, with the costs of health plans as a key consideration.
 
A new study by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research provides insights into how neighborhoods recover from disasters. It shows that residents of twelve neighborhoods hit by Superstorm Sandy report generally high levels of recovery two years after the disaster. However, recovery is not universal as many people are living in communities where recovery has yet to happen, and some question whether it ever will. Social resources in a neighborhood are strongly associated with how residents view the resilience of their community, regardless of neighborhood socioeconomic status. Social resources can make neighborhoods with fewer financial resources more resilient, and an absence of social resources can make it more difficult for wealthier neighborhoods to recover from disasters. 
 
A new survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research provides new and actionable data about the opinions of private insurance consumers during this moment of profound reform to the health insurance market. It shows that most, but not all, privately insured Americans age 18-64 are satisfied with their health plans, are not deterred from using their health benefits due to cost, and say costs do not have a large impact on their finances. A significant minority of those with private health insurance, however, including those covered by high-deductible health plans (HDHPs), are greatly impacted by the out-of-pocket cost of health care—they are concerned with the uncertainty of major expenses, skip necessary medical treatment, and experience real financial burden when obtaining health care.
 
Finding Quality Doctors: How Americans Evaluate Provider Quality in the United States
 
A new survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that Americans do not think that information about the quality of health care providers is easy to come by, and they lack trust in information sources that tend to produce such indicators. The study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, produces new and actionable data during a crucial period of the Affordable Care Act’s implementation. Interviews were conducted with 1,002 adults age 18 and over. 

The People's Agenda: America's Priorities and Outlook for 2014
 
A society as large and complex as the United States faces many problems, and the country’s official institutions must prioritize some problems over others. Public opinion pollsters have long tried to inform policymakers and the media about which problems the public sees as most important, and political analysts have also tried to capture this information in order to understand the impact of important issues on political behavior. Capturing the public’s priorities for public policy can be among the most important and informative data that pollsters are able to collect, and news organizations can use this information to help report on whether the actions of official institutions are in step with the wishes of the citizens they serve.


Teens, Young Adults, and Digital Discrimination

​Seeking to contribute rigorous research on this issue, MTV and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,297 teens and young adults between the ages of 14 and 24 to track the exposure of young people in the United States to discriminatory and hurtful language online and to better understand where on the internet young people encounter these messages.

 

With funding from the Rockefeller Foundation, which has a long-standing commitment to support for work on the issue of resilience, the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research will be home to a 9-month fellowship in which a journalist will receive special training and a significant opportunity to do high-impact journalism on the issues.

 
 

The Digital Abuse Study: Experiences of Young Teens and Adults

 

In response to growing concerns about the harmful effects of digital abuse, both public and private sector organizations initiated campaigns and interventions aimed at educating young people about appropriate online behavior and how to deal with digital abuse when it happens. Seeking to contribute rigorous research on this issue, MTV and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,297 teens and young adults between the ages of 14 and 24 to gain a fresh look at digital use and abuse among young people in the United States and to update previous estimates from AP and MTV on the number of teens and young adults involved in or affected by digital abuse.

 

 

Working Longer: Older Americans' Attitudes on Work and Retirement

With funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement. Retirement is not only coming later in life, but for many it no longer represents a complete exit from the workforce. The key findings from the study, summarized below, provide much-needed information on the implications for individuals and the economy of this growing trend toward working later in life. This survey gives a voice to older Americans and contributes to an in-depth public discourse on the issue.


 

The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted 1,008 interviews with a representative sample of Americans. The key findings provide an important source of data for policymakers, journalists, and the public to understand where the public stands on this issue. 


Parents Attitudes on the Quality of Education in the United States

Between America’s long-standing national objective of improving the strength of the public school system to prepare students for college and careers and the focus of the Obama administration on education as a pathway to economic security for the middle class and improving the economy, education issues and policy have been in the spotlight. A central focus of the policy discussion is the measurement of quality and the utilization of quality data to improve student outcomes.

The Public Mood: White Malaise, But Optimism Among Blacks, Hispanics

There has been much lament in recent years over the growing pessimism of the American public. Numerous observers have remarked upon the gloomy mood of the American people, drawing on both anecdotes and public opinion polls to chronicle the growing lack of confidence in the future of America. But by generalizing about the trend in the aggregate, many of those observers have missed the fact that not every social group sees the future as darkly as every other.

Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy

Striking landfall in the United States on October 29, 2012, Superstorm Sandy affected large areas of coastal New York and New Jersey, devastated communities, killed more than 130 people, and caused tens of billions of dollars in property damage. The impacts of the storm are still being felt in many communities today as the long recovery process continues.

 
 
 
 

Long-Term Care: Perceptions, and Attitudes among Americans 40 or Older

 

The U.S. population is aging rapidly, with projections that the population of those over age 65 will nearly double by the time the last baby boomers reach age 65. In 2000, seniors comprised 12 percent of the U.S. population. By 2030, that number is expected to rise to 19 percent or 72 million Americans over the age of 65. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services projections estimate that 70 percent of Americans who reach the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care in their lives for an average of three years. With the aging population come important social and public policy questions about preparing for and providing quality long-term care.

 
 

America's Lower-Wage Workforce

With a focus on generating new and actionable data on the lower-wage workforce in America to inform the national dialogue, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research conducted a unique two-part study to better understand how lower-wage workers and employers think about jobs and opportunities for advancing workers’ careers.

 

Obesity in the United States: Public Perceptions

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a nationally representative household survey with more than 1,000 adults to measure the general public’s opinions about obesity and obesity-related health issues in the United States. The survey assessed how the public understands the reasons behind the rising rates of obesity in the U.S., the connection between obesity and health issues including diabetes, and the role of government in addressing obesity. The results provide insight into the public’s perception of the severity of the obesity problem and their feeling about where responsibility lies for implementing solutions.


Energy Issues: How the Public Understands and Acts

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research, with funding from the Joyce Foundation, conducted a nationally representative household survey with 1,008 adults to measure the general public’s opinions, understanding, and awareness of key energy issues in the United States. The survey is an in-depth look at modern energy problems, and how Americans are responding.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research, with funding from the Joyce Foundation, conducted a nationally representative household survey with 1,008 adults to measure the general public’s opinions, understanding, and awareness of key energy issues in the United States. The survey is an in-depth look at modern energy problems, and how Americans are responding.

Civil Liberties and Security: 10 Years After 9/11

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 were a defining moment for a generation, and the decade that followed saw significant changes in government that had a direct impact on the lives of millions of Americans. In this nationally representative survey of more than 1,000 Americans, the AP-NORC Center explores public opinion about national security and the rights that define the American way of life, and tries to determine where people draw the line between civil liberties and security. The survey also looks back at the impact of the events of 9/11 and on how it has affected the way Americans live their lives today.