Projects

The AP-NORC Center develops projects around a variety of key issues and newsworthy topics with the potential for social impact. Examples include, but are not limited to education, health care, race relations, unemployment and poverty, and international research. With these social, political, and cultural trends in mind, the AP-NORC Center has executeda number of projects and research programs.
 
Finding Quality Doctors: How Americans Evaluate Provider Quality in the United States
 
A new survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that Americans do not think that information about the quality of health care providers is easy to come by, and they lack trust in information sources that tend to produce such indicators. The study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, produces new and actionable data during a crucial period of the Affordable Care Act’s implementation. Interviews were conducted with 1,002 adults age 18 and over. 

The People's Agenda: America's Priorities and Outlook for 2014
 
A society as large and complex as the United States faces many problems, and the country’s official institutions must prioritize some problems over others. Public opinion pollsters have long tried to inform policymakers and the media about which problems the public sees as most important, and political analysts have also tried to capture this information in order to understand the impact of important issues on political behavior. Capturing the public’s priorities for public policy can be among the most important and informative data that pollsters are able to collect, and news organizations can use this information to help report on whether the actions of official institutions are in step with the wishes of the citizens they serve.


Teens, Young Adults, and Digital Discrimination

​Seeking to contribute rigorous research on this issue, MTV and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,297 teens and young adults between the ages of 14 and 24 to track the exposure of young people in the United States to discriminatory and hurtful language online and to better understand where on the internet young people encounter these messages.

The AP-NORC Journalism Fellowship on Community Resilience

With funding from the Rockefeller Foundation, which has a long-standing commitment to support for work on the issue of resilience, the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research will be home to a 9-month fellowship in which a journalist will receive special training and a significant opportunity to do high-impact journalism on the issues.

 

The Digital Abuse Study: Experiences of Young Teens and Adults

In response to growing concerns about the harmful effects of digital abuse, both public and private sector organizations initiated campaigns and interventions aimed at educating young people about appropriate online behavior and how to deal with digital abuse when it happens. Seeking to contribute rigorous research on this issue, MTV and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,297 teens and young adults between the ages of 14 and 24 to gain a fresh look at digital use and abuse among young people in the United States and to update previous estimates from AP and MTV on the number of teens and young adults involved in or affected by digital abuse.

 

Working Longer: Older Americans' Attitudes on Work and Retirement

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.  Retirement is not only coming later in life, but for many it no longer represents a complete exit from the workforce.  The key findings from the study, summarized below, provide much-needed information on the implications for individuals and the economy of this growing trend toward working later in life.  This survey gives a voice to older Americans and contributes to an in-depth public discourse on the issue.

The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted 1,008 interviews with a representative sample of Americans. The key findings provide an important source of data for policymakers, journalists, and the public to understand where the public stands on this issue. 


Parents Attitudes on the Quality of Education in the United States

Between America’s long-standing national objective of improving the strength of the public school system to prepare students for college and careers and the focus of the Obama administration on education as a pathway to economic security for the middle class and improving the economy, education issues and policy have been in the spotlight. A central focus of the policy discussion is the measurement of quality and the utilization of quality data to improve student outcomes.

The Public Mood: White Malaise, But Optimism Among Blacks, Hispanics

There has been much lament in recent years over the growing pessimism of the American public. Numerous observers have remarked upon the gloomy mood of the American people, drawing on both anecdotes and public opinion polls to chronicle the growing lack of confidence in the future of America. But by generalizing about the trend in the aggregate, many of those observers have missed the fact that not every social group sees the future as darkly as every other.

Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy

Striking landfall in the United States on October 29, 2012, Superstorm Sandy affected large areas of coastal New York and New Jersey, devastated communities, killed more than 130 people, and caused tens of billions of dollars in property damage. The impacts of the storm are still being felt in many communities today as the long recovery process continues.

 
 
 
 

Long-Term Care: Perceptions, and Attitudes among Americans 40 or Older

 

The U.S. population is aging rapidly, with projections that the population of those over age 65 will nearly double by the time the last baby boomers reach age 65. In 2000, seniors comprised 12 percent of the U.S. population. By 2030, that number is expected to rise to 19 percent or 72 million Americans over the age of 65. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services projections estimate that 70 percent of Americans who reach the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care in their lives for an average of three years. With the aging population come important social and public policy questions about preparing for and providing quality long-term care.

 
 

America's Lower-Wage Workforce

With a focus on generating new and actionable data on the lower-wage workforce in America to inform the national dialogue, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research conducted a unique two-part study to better understand how lower-wage workers and employers think about jobs and opportunities for advancing workers’ careers.

 

Obesity in the United States: Public Perceptions

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a nationally representative household survey with more than 1,000 adults to measure the general public’s opinions about obesity and obesity-related health issues in the United States. The survey assessed how the public understands the reasons behind the rising rates of obesity in the U.S., the connection between obesity and health issues including diabetes, and the role of government in addressing obesity. The results provide insight into the public’s perception of the severity of the obesity problem and their feeling about where responsibility lies for implementing solutions.

 

The AP-NORC Journalism Fellowship on the Economics of Aging and Work

The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research , with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is proud to offer a 12-month residential fellowship focused on issues surrounding the aging workforce in the United States.  The 2013 fellowship focuses on the economics of Americans working longer.


Energy Issues: How the Public Understands and Acts

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research, with funding from the Joyce Foundation, conducted a nationally representative household survey with 1,008 adults to measure the general public’s opinions, understanding, and awareness of key energy issues in the United States. The survey is an in-depth look at modern energy problems, and how Americans are responding.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs research, with funding from the Joyce Foundation, conducted a nationally representative household survey with 1,008 adults to measure the general public’s opinions, understanding, and awareness of key energy issues in the United States. The survey is an in-depth look at modern energy problems, and how Americans are responding.

Civil Liberties and Security: 10 Years After 9/11

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 were a defining moment for a generation, and the decade that followed saw significant changes in government that had a direct impact on the lives of millions of Americans. In this nationally representative survey of more than 1,000 Americans, the AP-NORC Center explores public opinion about national security and the rights that define the American way of life, and tries to determine where people draw the line between civil liberties and security. The survey also looks back at the impact of the events of 9/11 and on how it has affected the way Americans live their lives today.